Pitch Perfect

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What is the fine line between saying enough to get their interest in you but not too much to leave them satisfied there is nothing to discuss? Customers require courtship.

Ever notice how some people have a really great sales pitch? They say just enough, are just clear enough, just distinctive enough to connect with their target. Some are natural talents, others rely on professional agencies or consultants to craft the message for them.

If it makes you feel better, most of these great pitches aren’t on their maiden voyage. They are the product of trial and error, modes, and metrics.

These finely honed pitches have things in common, even though the objective is to be different enough to stand out.

They have clarity. What are they pitching? What is the point of the message? What are they selling and how much is it going to cost? Why do I need it, and why do I need it from this person in particular?

It would seem that clarity would be enough to get those phones to ring or the response forms to flood in. What happens, however, when the pitch has ticked all the boxes and all you hear out there is the crickets?

What is the problem?

The challenge is deeper than just being clear. Sometimes the problem is in being overly clear. There is always that uh-oh moment – in any business – where we toss our pitch and immediately ask ourselves if we’ve already lost the client because we said too much.

Did I scare them off with my price? Am I trying too hard to be all things to all people with my offerings? Did I come across as trying too hard by trying to cover all the bases?

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What is the fine line between saying enough to get their interest in YOU but not too much to leave them satisfied there is nothing to discuss?

You know yourself too well. You’re trying to get others to know you just as well in your first pitch. Customers require courtship. They need enough to be interested, but not enough to think they know your whole story. Finding that balance is the key.

So think of it exactly as that – courtship. What would you say about your product or service that clearly answers the questions of “Who am I? What am I pitching? Why do you need it, and specifically, why do you need it from me?” Where is the point in the message where it stops and leaves people wanting more?

When you find that point, you have found your perfect pitch.